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  • bash (Bourne Again Shell)

    Bash (Bourne Again Shell ) is the free version of the Bourne shell distributed with Linux and GNU operating systems. 

  • Common Desktop Environment (CDE)

    The Common Desktop Environment (CDE) is a standardized graphical user interface (GUI) for open systems. 

  • Ant

    Ant is an open source build tool (a program for putting together all the pieces of a program) from the Apache Software Foundation. 

  • Perl

    Perl is a script programming language that is similar in syntax to the C language and that includes a number of popular UNIX facilities such as sed, awk, and tr. 

  • X Window System (X or XWindows)

    The X Window System (sometimes referred to as "X" or as "XWindows") is an open, cross-platform, client/server system for managing a windowed graphical user interface in a distributed network. 

  • makefile

    A makefile is used with the UNIX make utility to determine which portions of a program to compile. 

  • pipe

    In computer programming, especially in UNIX operating systems, a pipe is a technique for passing information from one program process to another. 

  • sudo (superuser do)

    Sudo (superuser do) is a utility for UNIX- and Linux-based systems that provides an efficient way to give specific users permission to use specific system commands at the root (most powerful) level of the system. Sudo also logs all commands and argum... 

  • backward compatible (backward compatibility)

    Backward compatible (sometimes 'backward-compatible' or 'backwards compatible') refers to a hardware or software system that can successfully use data from earlier versions of the system or with other systems. 

  • shebang (#!)

    Among UNIX shell (user interface) users, a shebang is a term for the "#!" characters that must begin the first line of a script.